AUB and World War Two (1939-45) > 1942-1943 > Hope and an end in Sight? Academia Carries on

Shortages of Supplies: AUB copes and helps out

As it was learned that the Germans had drained Syria of a large amount of grain, the American Red Cross sent big supplies of flour, dried milk and other things to Beirut.    They were temporarily stored in University buildings and later distributed to needy Syrians and Lebanese,  as well as to sufferers in Greece and the Polish camps of Iran.

 

Public service  / Welfare Work

Village Welfare Program, 1942

Report of the President of the American University of Beirut, 77th,  1942-43, p.6

Archives and Special Collections, Jafet Library, AUB

 Hope

"Fortunately the people of the country have not suffered from the high prices as much as one would expect. So much work has been demanded, that there is also no unemployment and only widows and old people feel the misery of the war. As the new harvest promises to be a record breaking one, conditions should not grow worse during the coming year."

 

Report of the President of the American University of Beirut for the Seventy-Seventh Year, 1942-1943: p. 2

 

 

 

Tripoli Harbour

Tripoli, Boats meeting steamer in harbour [approximately 1900 to 1920

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Shipments Arrive

"The University has been favored by receiving some large shipments of text books and supplies, but journals, library books, paper, drugs, new equipment, and laboratory supplies are naturally more difficult to obtain in a war time than under normal circumstances. Accordingly, the efficiency of the institution and the intellectual life has suffered to a certain extent."

 

Report of the President of the American University of Beirut for the Seventy-Seventh Year, 1942-1943: p 4

College Hall Library,  1940

College Hall Library, 1940

Archives and Special Collections, Jafet Library, AUB

Faculty Return

Fortunately a number of our professors, who had left during the Vichy period, returned to the University.    Others proceeded to the United States for furloughs or to live there permanently. During the next five years, while the foreign armies were  still in the country, life at the University was abnormal but very active. As there were few Anglo-Saxons at Beirut, much more of the responsibility for the teaching and administration was placed upon the shoulders of the local members of the staff, who did such good work that they deserve the highest praise.

It was at this time that the United States entered the war, so that instead of being neutral, we now became belligerents and true allies of our British and Free French associates.

Meeting at Marquand House, 1940s

Senate Meeting at Marquand House, 1940s

Archives and Special Collections, Jafet Library, AUB

 

 Students learn outside the Classroom

"Most of the students are expected to work in the library, offices, laboratories, and dining halls if they wish to earn money to help pay their fees. On the other hand, a certain number of free scholarships are given to encourage the brightest students. During the past year 79 students of the schools of Arts and Sciences, Medicine and Pharmacy were given employment and 35 qualified for free scholarships. A number of other students also profited by help from certain endowed scholarships, so that there was adequate financial aid to stimulate them to prove their ability along intellectual lines."

 

Report of the President of the American University of Beirut for the Seventy-Seventh Year, 1942-1943: p 4

Course in Malariology

Course in Malariology

Report of the President of the American University of Beirut, 78th, 1943-44, p. 3

Archives and Special Collections, Jafet Library, AUB

 

"The MA degree is becoming more and more respected"

"The MA degree is becoming more and more respected, so that there is an increasing desire on the part of the students to complete work for the M.A. But as only a student of "Honours" course is eligible to qualify for the M.A, it is necessary for a student to make good in sophomore year, so as to be accepted for "Honours" work and later for the M.A itself."

 

"As many more applicants have wished to enter than it was possible to receive, there has been a very wholesome spirit of competition amongst the students, especially in the medical and pre-medical classes. The adoption of the British system whereby the courses are divided into the two categories of "Honours" and "Pass", has also stimulated the students to do good work. As they are anxious to qualify for the "Honours" courses, they make a special effort to succeed."

 

Report of the President of the American University of Beirut for the Seventy-Seventh Year, 1942-1943: p 4

MA Degree 1943

 

 

 

AUB Thesis, 1943

Hineidi, T., & American University of Beirut. Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Political Studies and Public Administration. (1943). The problem of Arab unity. Beirut.

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